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Firsts

What Asian glow means to me

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What Asian glow means to me

My adoptive parents had never heard of this genetic condition and consequently never warned me about it. Regardless, this was a tangible, physical phenomenon connecting me to my Chinese ancestry, whether I liked it or not.

Writing by Ashley Dawn Louise Bach
Art by Tina Lê and Helen Yu

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Two Poems

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Two Poems

College boy with
too much time, reads a page
of Marquez, thinks he’s a genius.
Now, a cold body against cold
limestone.

Poetry by Eileen Huang
Illustration by Béatrice Bùi

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PAWs Like Me

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PAWs Like Me

A conversation between Sarah Gotowka and Carrie Freshour explores their shared experience of being transnational Korean adoptees, and their lasting friendship and sisterhood that grew after a chance encounter at Taste of Thai Express. 

Writing by Sarah Gotowka and Carrie Freshour

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Shipwreck

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Shipwreck

“His nenggan had ignited and embers were falling. I began to plead with my father. My voice cracked over the “pleases” and my brother began to echo me, his words wavering. I looked over and noticed my mother’s white knuckles.”

Writing by Lianne Xiao
Illustration by Loren Yeung

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The first time I learned to be on my own

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The first time I learned to be on my own

"I realized that I couldn’t let my job define my entire life anymore. I had to do something else to sustain my happiness by giving myself something to look forward to.

Which is when I started to draw again."

Writing by Jieun Lee
Illustrations by Jieun Lee

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Golden Skin

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Golden Skin

9th grade. That’s when I started to examine my own skin.

Writing by Simon Tran
Illustration by Keet Geniza

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The First Time

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The First Time

The first time: 

I raised my question of my intersectionality

Am I Deaf? Am I POC? Am I Queer?

Poetry and illustration by Jessica Leung

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The Whole Six Yards

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The Whole Six Yards

I am only knee deep, but after flailing helplessly for twenty minutes it is clear that I am drowning. It takes several additional minutes to accustom myself to this fact, for it feels like a failure as fundamental as forgetting how to breathe.

Writing by Nina Sudhakar
Photography by Saima Desai

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